Taekwondo VS Muay Thai (End with KO)

 

Taekwondo Fighter VS Muay Thai Fighter (Dieselnoi Chor Thanasukarn).

about TE and TI KHAO

Kicking (Te)

English Thai Romanization IPA
Straight Kick เตะตรง Te trong  [tèʔ troŋ]
Roundhouse Kick เตะตัด Te tat  [tèʔ tàt]
Diagonal Kick เตะเฉียง Te chiang  [tèʔ tɕʰǐəŋ]
Half-Shin, Half-Knee Kick เตะครึ่งแข้งครึ่งเข่า Te khrueng khaeng khrueng khao  [tèʔ kʰrɯ̂ŋ kʰɛ̂ŋ kʰrɯ̂ŋ kʰàw]
Reverse Roundhouse Kick เตะกลับหลัง Te klap lang  [tèʔ klàp lǎŋ]
Down Roundhouse Kick เตะกด Te kot  [tèʔ kòt]
Axe Heel Kick เตะเข่า Te khao  [tèʔ kʰàw]
Jump Kick กระโดดเตะ Kradot te  [kradòːt tèʔ]
Step-Up Kick เขยิบเตะ Khayoep te  [kʰa.jɤ̀p tèʔ]

The two most common kicks in muay Thai are known as the thip (literally “foot jab”) and the te chiang (kicking upwards in the shape of a triangle cutting under the arm and ribs) or roundhouse kick. The Thai roundhouse kick uses a rotational movement of the entire body and has been widely adopted by practitioners of other combat sports. it is done from a circular stance with the back leg just a little ways back (roughly shoulder width apart) in comparison to instinctive upper body fighting (boxing) where the legs must create a wider base. The roundhouse kick draws its power entirely from the rotational movement of the body; the hips. It is thought many fighters use a counter rotation of the arms to intensify the power of this kick, but in actuality the power is from the hips and the arms are put in said position to get them out of the way.

If a roundhouse kick is attempted by the opponent, the Thai boxer will normally check the kick, that is he will block the kick with his own shin. Thai boxers are trained to always connect with the shin. The foot contains many fine bones and is much weaker. A fighter may end up hurting himself if he tries to strike with his foot or instep. Shins are trained by repeatedly striking firm objects, such as pads or heavy bags.

Knee (Ti Khao)

English Thai Romanization IPA
Straight Knee Strike เข่าตรง Khao trong  [kʰàw troŋ]
Diagonal Knee Strike เข่าเฉียง Khao chiang  [kʰàw tɕʰǐəŋ]
Curving Knee Strike เข่าโค้ง Khao khong  [kʰàw kʰóːŋ]
Horizontal Knee Strike เข่าตัด Khao tat  [kʰàw tàt]
Knee Slap เข่าตบ Khao top  [kʰàw tòp]
Knee Bomb เข่ายาว Khao yao  [kʰàw jaːw]
Flying Knee เข่าลอย Khao loi  [kʰàw lɔːj]
Step-Up Knee Strike เข่าเหยียบ Khao yiap  [kʰàw jìəp]
  • Khao dot  [kʰàw dòːt] (Jumping knee strike) – the boxer jumps up on one leg and strikes with that leg’s knee.
  • Khao loi (Flying knee strike) – the boxer takes a step(s), jumps forward and off one leg and strikes with that leg’s knee.
  • Khao thon  [kʰàw tʰoːn] (Straight knee strike) – the boxer simply thrusts it forward but not upwards, unless he is holding an opponents head down in a clinch and intend to knee upwards into the face. According to one written source, this technique is somewhat more recent than khao dot or khao loi. Supposedly, when the Thai boxers fought with rope-bound hands rather than the modern boxing gloves, this particular technique was subject to potentially vicious cutting, slicing and sawing by an alert opponent who would block it or deflect it with the sharp “rope-glove” edges which are sometimes dipped in water to make the rope much stronger. This explanation also holds true for some of the following knee strikes below as well.