How to Increase your Kicking Speed – TUTORIAL

Here, we talk about improving kick speed by combining more traditional style Taekwondo aspects. A Muay Thai kick is much more harder, meant to build up momentum and power, while a Karate or Taekwondo kick is faster, and more of a linear snap kick.

about KICK

A kick is a physical strike using the foot, leg, or knee (the latter is also known as a knee strike). This type of attack is used frequently by hooved animals as well as humans in the context of stand-up fighting. Kicks play a significant role in many forms of martial arts, such as savate, taekwondo, sikaran, karate, Pankration, Combat Hopak, Kung fu, Vovinam, kickboxing, Muay Thai, capoeira, silat, and kalaripayattu.

Kicking is also prominent from its use in many sports, especially those called football. The best known of these sports is association football, also known as soccer.

As the human leg is longer and stronger than the arm, kicks are generally used to keep an opponent at a distance, surprise him or her with their range, and inflict substantial damage. On the other hand, stance is very important in any combat system, and any attempt to deliver a kick will necessarily compromise one’s stability of stance.

The application of kicks is thus a question of the tradeoff between the power that can be delivered vs. the cost incurred to balance. Since combat situations are fluid, understanding this tradeoff and making the appropriate decision to adjust to each moment is key.

Kicks are commonly directed against helpless or downed targets, while for more general self-defense applications, the consensus is that simple kicks aimed at vulnerable targets below the chest may be highly efficient, but should be executed with a degree of care.

Self-defense experts, such as author and teacher Marc Macyoung, claim that kicks should be aimed no higher than the waist/stomach. Thus, the fighter should not compromise their balance while delivering a kick, and retract the leg properly to avoid grappling.

It is often recommended to build and drill simple combinations that involve attacking different levels of an opponent. A common example would be distracting an opponent’s focus via a fake jab, following up with a powerful attack at the opponent’s legs and punching.

Further, since low kicks are inherently quicker and harder to see and dodge in general they are often emphasized in a street fight scenario.